Issue 12  •  Spring 2013

Centerfold

Austra Goes Analog And Likes It: A Conversation With Katie Stelmanis & Maya Postepski

Written by Jesse Sposato|Photos by Jason Rodgers|Styling by Shala Rothenberg|Hair and makeup by Pascale Poma

I hate to admit it, but it’s harder to fall in love with bands these days at the same speed or with the same urgency as when I was a teenager. I don’t have the kind of time I did then to put into “discovering” cool bands like it's my full-time job. (I didn’t have that kind of time then either as I should have been doing schoolwork, but getting into music was obvs way more fun.)

 
Cheryl Cohen Greene is a certified clinical sexologist, sex therapist, and surrogate partner with over thirty years of experience. Partner surrogates, sometimes referred to as sex surrogates (the former is the preferred terminology), work in conjunction with psychologists and therapists to address sexual dysfunction, body-image issues, anxiety, communication roadblocks, and a variety of problems that hinder peoples' relationships with themselves and their partners. Cheryl notes that her work is not just about sex and sexuality, but also a gradual increase of intimacy: “I always say to my clients 'You are now taking an advanced course in human sexuality, and we're doing the lab work.  You and I are going to mix the potions and touch and feel and learn the physical part of it.'”
 

Sesame Street Reaches Out to Children with Incarcerated Parents

Written by Katy Otto|Photos courtesy of Sesame Street
Incarceration is not an issue we talk about in public nearly enough. For some of us, we have the luxury of not thinking about prison on a daily basis. But keeping the community and personal impact of incarceration in the shadows does a disservice to us all. Especially the children of those on the inside.
 
I followed up my interview with Sesame Street with an interview with Malissa Gamble, a Philadelphia woman who was formerly incarcerated and separated from her children. Malissa is a member of Decarcerate PA and the founder of The Time is Now to Make a Change.
 

Lisa Hanawalt is a Brooklyn-based artist whose first major book, My Dirty Dumb Eyes, comes out on Drawn & Quarterly in May. Her work has appeared in The Hairpin, Vanity Fair, The Believer, and she illustrated a book about farts once. I thought it would be a good idea to meet Lisa for coffee at Cookie Road in Greenpoint to talk about her life, and to also make sure and point out that I knew a lot about her—even prior to our interview, because I’d been stalking her on Twitter and Instagram for a month.

 

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